Hockey Lingo


| A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M |

| N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |


All-Star game

An NHL exhibition ice hockey game that is usually held during during the middle of the regular season.  Many of the NHL’s star players play against each other.


Assist

The pass or passes that precede a goal.  A maximum of two assists can be credited for one goal.


Attacking line

Three forward players as a unit (Center, Left Winger and Right Winger) Also known as a forward line.


Attacking zone

The area in the opponents end of the ice between the blue line and the goal line


Away team

The team that is the guest at the area in which they are playing.


Backcheck

An attempt by a player to regain the puck by checking or harassing an opponent on their way back to their defensive zone.


Backhand shot

A shot that is taken from the backside of the blade of the hockey stick. Also called a backhander.


Backhander

A shot that is taken from the backside of the blade of the hockey stick.  Also called a backhand shot.


Beat the defense

To get by one or both of the defensemen.


Beat the goalie

To fake out or trick the goalie and score a goal.


Behind the net

The are of ice behind the goal cage.


Bird cage

The cage on the helmet


Biscuit

The puck.


Biscuit in the basket

To score a goal.


Blind pass

To pass the puck without looking.


Blocker

The pad that the goaltender wears on their stick-holding hand.


Blue lines

Two blue, 12 inch wide lines running parallel across the ice, each 60 feet from the goal.  They divide the rink into 3 zones, the attacking, defending and neutral (center) zone.


Blueliner

Defensemen, which are two players who make up the team’s defensive unit, usually station in or near their defensive zone to help the goalie guard against attacks, sometimes they lead an attack.


Boarding

Checking a player from behind into the boards.


Boards

A wooden or fiberglass wall 3 1/2 to 4 feet high that surrounds the rink.


Body checking

When a player uses their hip or body to knock an opponent against the boards or to the ice.  Also called hip checking)


Breakaway

When a player has possession of the puck and there are no defenders other than the goalie between him and the opposing goal.


Breaking pass

A pass to a teammate who is trying for breakaway


Breakout

When a team comes out of their defensive zone with the puck.


Butterfly

A style of goal tending where the goalie tends to cover the lower half of the net with their leg pads.

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Center ice

The area of ice between the two blue lines.  Also called the neutral zone.


Center ice circle

A circle at the center of the ice  measuring 30 feet in diameter.  It is where the puck is dropped in a face-off to begin the game and to restart the game after a goal has been scored.


Center line

A red 12 inch wide line across the lice midway between the two goals.


Centering pass

A pass from an attacking player towards the middle of the ice to a teammate with a better angle at the goal.


Charging

When a player or goalkeeper skates or jumps into or body checks a player.  A minor or major penalty may be imposed.  If  a player charges into a goalie a game misconduct may be imposed.


Check

Any contact initiated by the defending player against an opponent to slow the opponent down and/or get possession of the puck.


Cherry picking

When a player stays near their opponent’s defensive zone waiting for a loose puck or a pass so that he can have a breakaway.


Clearing the puck

Getting the puck out of one’s own defensive zone


Clearing the zone

When a defending player shots the puck out of the opponent’s attacking zone, all of the players must then leave or “clear the zone” to avoid being called offside when the puck reenters the zone.


Coincidental penalty

When both teams are assessed an equal amount of penalties at the same time.


Contract year

Last year of a player’s multi-year contract.


Crease

The blue area of ice in font of the goal cage.  Attacking players are not allowed to intentionally interfere with the goaltender in the crease.


Crease lines

The red lines that form the semi-circle with a 6 foot radium in front of the goal.  Also called the goal crease.


Crossbar

The horizontal bar that connects the top of  the two goal posts.


Cross-checking

A minor penalty that occurs when a player hits an opponent with his stick while it is held in both hands and no part of the stick is touching the ice.  If blood is drawn or a serious injury occurs then it becomes a major penalty or even a game misconduct.

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Defense

The team without the puck.


Defensemen

Two players who make up the team’s defensive unit, usually station in or near their defensive zone to help the goalie guard against attacks, sometimes they lead an attack.


Defensive line

consists of two defensemen.


Defensive zone

The area in a team’s own end of the ice between the blue line and the goal line.


Deflection

A shot or pass that changes it’s direction when it strikes a player or another object causing it to change direction.  Sometimes it can be a deliberate act of a player who uses their stick to redirect a teammate’s shot into the goal cage.


Deke

To fake an opponent out of their position.


Delay of game

A minor penalty that is given to any player who purposely delays the game in any way.  Such as shooting or batting the puck outside the playing area or displace the goalpost from it’s normal position.  A penalty shot may be given if a goal post is intentionally displaced when an opposing player has a breakaway.


Delayed call

When an official raises his arm but does not blow his whistle.  He waits to see the outcome of a play before calling a penalty.  This is done so that the non-offending team is not penalized by stopping their momentum.  Also called delayed whistle.


Delayed penalty

When an official raises his arm but does not blow his whistle.  He waits to see the outcome of a play before calling a penalty.  This is done so that the non-offending team is not penalized by stopping their momentum.  It could also be when a penalty is not immediately assessed because the offending team already has two players in the penalty box.  It is then enforced when one of the players leave the box.


Delayed whistle

When an official raises his arm but does not blow his whistle.  He waits to see the outcome of a play before calling a penalty.  This is done so that the non-offending team is not penalized by stopping their momentum. Also called delayed call.


Double minor

A type of minor penalty that is given for certain accidental infractions that result in an injury to another player or for deliberate attempts to injure an opponent that are unsuccessful.  The penalty time served is four minutes.


Drop pass

When a player leaves the puck behind him for a teammate to pick up.

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Elbowing

A minor penalty which occurs when a player strikes his opponent with an elbow to interfere with his progress.



Empty net

A net that is unprotected because the goalie is out of position or off the ice.


Empty net goal

A goal scored when the opposing goalie is not on the ice.



Endboards 

The boards at each end of the rink.



Exhibition game

A game that is not included in the regular season schedule and does not count in the standings.  Such as the All-Star game and pre-season games.



Extra attacker

A player who has been substituted for the team’s goalie.  The goalie goes off the ice and another player comes on therefor the team has an extra player.

 

Face mask

A protective mask worn by the goalie



Face-off

Used to begin play at the beginning of a period or to resume the game after a play has been stopped.  One player from each team stands a stick-length apart with their stick blades flat on the ice.  An official then drops the puck between them, and the players try to gain control of the puck.



Face-off circle

A circle where an official and two players will hold a face=off.  There are five face-off circles, one in the center of the ice and two at each ends of the rink.



Fighting

When two or more players drop their sticks and gloves and begin fighting, which then results in a major penalty.  The player that is judged to be the instigator may get a game misconduct penalty.


Five hole

The space between the goalies legs


Five on three

When one team has had two players sent to the penalty box.  The opponent then has five players on the ice (not including the goalie) and the penalized team has three on the ice.  Also called a two-man advantage.


Five on five

When both teams have five skaters and one goalie on the ice.  Also called full strength.


Flat pass

When a player passes the puck to a teammate along the surface of the ice.


Flip pass

When a player passes the puck to a teammate by shooting the puck in the air.


Flip shot

A shot in which a player cups the puck in his stick and then flips it with his wrists up off the ice towards the goal.  This usually makes the puck harder to block.


Forecheck

To check or harass an opponent who has the puck in his defensive zone to keep the opponent in their end of the rink while trying to regain control of the puck.


Forehand pass

A pass made from the same side of the body as the stick hand.  From the right side of a right-handed player or from the left side of a left-handed player.


Forehand shot

A pass made from the same side of the body as the stick hand.  From the right side of a right-handed player or from the left side of a left-handed player.


Forward

One of three players who make up the team’s forward line.  The center, left wing and right wing.


Forward line

Three forward players as a unit; center, left and right wring.  They are responsible for most of the scoring.  Also known as an attacking line.


Freeze the puck

To hold the puck against the boards with a skate or stick in order to stop play or gain a face-off.


Full strength

When both teams have five skaters and one goaltender on the ice.  Also called five-on-five.

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Game misconduct penalty

A penalty in which a player is thrown out for the rest of the game and assessed for a serious violation such as starting a fight or restarting a fight after it has been stopped.  If the player is thrown out of the game the team does not have to play short-handed.


Goal

When the puck completely crosses the goal line within the goal frame.


Goal cage

A 6 foot wide by 4 foot high tubular steel frame consisting of a cross bar and two goalposts to which a net is attached.  Two are used in a game, one sits at each end of the ice on the goal line.  (Also known as a hockey net)


Goal crease

A half circle area with a 6 foot radius at the opening of the net, the area is outlined with red and usually solid blue on the inside.  It is the goalies playing area and the attacking players must not interfere with the goal tending.


Goal line

The two inch red line between the goalposts that stretches in both directions to the sideboards.


Goalie

The heavily padded guy that guards their own teams net, their main goal is to try to stop the puck from entering the net. Also known as goalkeeper, goaltender and netminder.


Goalkeeper

The heavily padded guy that guards their own teams net, their main goal is to try to stop the puck from entering the net.  Also known as the goalie, goaltender and netminder.


Goaltender

The heavily padded guy that guards their own teams net, their main goal is to try to stop the puck from entering the net.  Also known as the goalie, goalkeeper and netminder.


Goals against

The total number of goals given up by a goaltender or a team within a given period of time. (GA)


GP

An Abbreviation for “games played”.

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Hand pass

When a player passes the puck with their hand to a teammate.  This is only legal when a defending player passes the puck to a teammate who is within their own half of the rink (defensive zone) and is received within the same half.


Hat-trick

When a player scores three or more goals in a game.


High sticking

A minor penalty which occurs when a player raises his stick above the normal height of his opponent’s shoulders and hits or interferes the opponent with it.  If injury is caused then it becomes a major penalty.  If no contact occurred and the referee determines that it was unintentional then a face-off is held in the offender’s defensive zone.


Hip checking

When a player uses their hip or body to knock an opponent against the boards or to the ice.  (Also called body checking)


Hockey net

A 6 foot wide by 4 foot high tubular steel frame consisting of a cross bar and two goalposts to which a net is attached.  Two are used in a game, one sits at each end of the ice on the goal line.  (Also known as a goal cage)


Holding

A minor penalty that occurs when a player grabs and holds onto an opponent or his equipment with his hards or arms to impede the opponent’s progress.


Holding the puck

A minor penalty that occurs when a player (other than the goalie) closes his hand on the puck or deliberatly falls on the puck or puts the puck under his body while laying on the ice.


Home team

The theam in whose arena the game is being held.  The home team wears the lighter coloured jerseys.


Home-ice advantage

The ability to make the last line change.


Hooking

When a player used a stick to hold or slow down another player.

 

Icing

When one team’s player shoots the puck down to the other end of the ice from his team’s side of the centerline.  The puck then crosses the goal line and the other team’s player touches the puck first.


Interference

A penatly in which a player attemps to impeded an opponent who does not have control of the puck.

 

Intermission

A fifteen minute recess between each of the three periods in a hockey game.


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